Food labels, what do they really mean?

I sometimes find myself in the grocery store saying, “What the heck does cage-free mean, anyway?” And then, what does free-range, farm-raised, etc… I have a clue, but probably not 100% of the correct information. Well, now there’s a great resource for me to reference when I get confused. I thought I’d share it with the readers of this blog, too.

This is the green blog, right? So what does food have to do with being green or sustainability? A lot. We need to eat, there’s no denying that. However, with every choice we make when considering “What’s for dinner?” (or any other meal) there is a direct impact on carbon emissions, land use, water use, clean air, waste and equally importantly – your health.  This label resource will also help you understand the impacts your diet may have on your health and your environment. We all know to eat less fat and high fiber. Eat some fruit and so on. But really, what do we know about what foods to choose if we also want to take care of the planet? Which is something we all need to consider, since our food- be it beef, greens, fish or tacos- comes from the planet. Without it being healthy- clean water and air, plentiful healthy soil- we will not be able to grow the food we need to survive.

Check out this link. What do you think about it? Does it influence your future food choices? Did you already know these things? This is only one of many really useful resources out there on food. If you want to know more or have a conversation or check out a book, article, etc. Stop by the Center for Sustainability in L242 or drop a line at sustainability@morainevalley.edu.

54.5 mpg by 2025

Friday of last week, President Obama announced a plan to make automobiles get a minimum of 54.5 mpg (I think the .5 is a little silly, but ok).

Here’s an interesting article about what type of options manufacturers are looking at to meet this goal. http://www.greenbiz.com/news/2011/08/01/how-automakers-can-meet-new-545-mpg-standards

This is great! But why not sooner? They have the technology (did you see Who Killed the Electric Car??).  It’s currently cost prohibitive for them and us. Oil is still relatively cheap. So why not put incentives in place to drive down these costs and get it done sooner? What do you think?