Moraine Valley takes steps to tackle climate change!

HOORAY!!!

Dr. Jenkins agreed to sign the American Colleges and Universities Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC), pledging to eliminate Moraine Valley’s net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in a reasonable period of time.

The ACUPCC defines climate neutrality as having no net GHG emissions, to be achieved by eliminating net GHG emissions, or by minimizing GHG emissions as much as possible, and using carbon offsets or other measures to mitigate the remaining emissions.

Through Dr. Jenkins’ leadership, Moraine Valley now joins the other signatories in the necessary cooperative and united action to make positive change for today and tomorrow.

Contact sustainability@morainevalley.edu for more information about this new effort. Please read the formal press release below for more. This is really exciting news!

Moraine Valley President Dr. Sylvia Jenkins signs Presidents’ Climate Commitment

Moraine Valley Community College President Dr. Sylvia Jenkins joined a growing list of university, college and community college presidents across the country who have signed a commitment to eliminate net greenhouse gas emissions from their campus operations before 2050. She signed the American Colleges and Universities Presidents’ Climate Commitment on Sept. 30.

Through this commitment, Moraine Valley agrees to complete an inventory of greenhouse gas emissions; create and implement a climate action plan; reduce emissions while the plan is being developed; integrate sustainability into the curriculum; and make the plan, inventory and progress reports publicly available annually. An important element of this pact is to educate students about climate neutrality—having no net greenhouse gas emissions—and sustainability.

By signing, Moraine Valley joins more than 670 institutions concerned about the growing adverse effects of global warming on people’s health, economy and the environment. This group recognizes the need to reduce emissions by 80 percent by at least mid-century to avert further global disaster.

“I’m pleased that we can join in this effort, and I know that Moraine Valley is fully committed to accepting this challenge and meeting those expectations well before the 2050 deadline,” Dr. Jenkins said. “We have worked hard over the last few years to cut down our greenhouse gas emissions and improve our sustainability efforts. We already have a LEED platinum certified campus center in Tinley Park and have earned a bronze rating from the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System that are testament to our dedication to this cause.”

MVCC president Dr. Jenkins signing climate commitment

PHOTO CAPTION: Dr. Sylvia Jenkins, center, signs the American Colleges and Universities Presidents’ Climate Commitment with members of Moraine Valley Community College’s Green Team as witnesses.

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            For news media inquiries, contact Maura Vizza, Moraine Valley public relations generalist, at (708) 974-5742 or VizzaM@morainevalley.edu.

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Melting permafrost exposes huge risks

Melting permafrost being ignored at climate talks, experts warn
More on the melting permafrost can be found in a story by Miguel Llanos of NBC News. Llanos sites an over view of the huge risks at hand and quotes U.N. Environment Program Director Achim Steiner who in announcing the report by top permafrost scientists said,

“Permafrost is one of the keys to the planet’s future because it contains large stores of frozen organic matter that, if thawed and released into the atmosphere, would amplify current global warming… Continuing to ignore the challenges of warming permafrost is not an option…”

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Our Future’s So Bright, We Gotta Wear Shades

Solar Bill Signing

(re-post from September Prairie State Protector eNews, Illinois Chapter of the Sierra Club)

Illinois’ future got brighter August 17, 2010, when Governor Quinn signed our solar bills HB 6202 and HB 5429 into law. House Bill 6202 requires Illinois’ regulated utilities to start buying some electricity from solar power plants starting in 2012, with steadily increasing amounts until 2015, when 6% of renewable energy purchases must come from solar power plants. By creating a stable market solar industries will be willing to invest in Illinois and as a result 5000 new jobs are expected to be created in the state.

House Bill 5429 or the Solar Bill of Rights removes barriers by homeowner and condo associations to placing solar panels on your roof. Removing those barriers is key to the future of solar, as installing small units on homes, businesses and reducing electricity losses through transmission are the areas for the greatest potential growth in the solar sector.

Illinois Sierrans pulled out all the stops to help get these bills passed. You visited and called legislators or took action through previous Prairie State Protectors. Consequently, we are one step closer to transitioning from the dirty fuels of the past. Thank you for being part of this victory for Illinois’ energy future.

POLAR MELTDOWN:

(reposted from MNN Daily Brief, e-Newsletter, September 24, 2009) POLAR MELTDOWN: Ice sheets in Greenland and western Antarctica are melting faster than scientists previously thought, and some places are experiencing “a runaway effect,” according to a team of British scientists who analyzed laser readings taken by NASA satellites. Some Antarctic ice sheets have been losing 30 feet of thickness annually since 2003, and while many areas are up to a mile thick to begin with, the melting is speeding up – the rate of Antarctic thinning was 50 percent higher between 2003 and 2007 than it was from 1995 to 2003. The problem isn’t warmer air, but warmer water, which wears down the ice from the outside in. “To some extent it’s a runaway effect,” says the lead author of the study, which was published online today in the journal Nature. “The question is how far will it run?” (Sources: Associated Press, USA TodaySan Francisco Chronicle)

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