Fact, Fiction, or Something Else: What Does the Artist Owe to History?

The musical Hamilton draws directly from the historical record, but it clearly is not a documentary, which many historians have noted. Writers and artists such as Shakespeare, Dan Brown, and Anne Rice dramatize historic settings, characters, and famous events in their works. Sometimes they bring history to life and sometime they perpetuate historical myths. What does it mean to be “true” to the historical record? How do artists get it right? How can they get it wrong? What do they owe to the record? A panel of history and literature faculty will come together to explore these questions.

Fact, Fiction, or Something Else: What Does the Artist Owe to History?

The audio of this discussion is available below:

50th Anniversary Video-Kate Wulle, Retired Theater Faculty Member

Moraine Valley Community College celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year. To learn more about and to re-live some of what those five decades have been like, the college has been collecting oral histories. Each week this semester we will highlight one of the videos.

Opening tonight at the John and Angeline Oremus Theater is the Academic Theater production of Spring Awakening. It seems like the perfect to time hear from long-time faculty member Kate Wulle about how the Theater department got off the ground here at MVCC. She and two other faculty members developed the program and were involved in the production of 100 plays on campus during her 31 years on the faculty. 

Kate also shares interesting stories about the campus in the early days. She talks about the interdisciplinary teaching structure and the college without walls concept. “Try having students give speeches while a film on emergency childbirth is playing on the other side of a rather thin drape.” Another story tells about faculty voicing concerns over architectural designs for a new building on campus with an auto shop on the second floor of the building.

To enjoy more of these oral histories, along with historic photos and documents, visit the MVCC College Archives. To find out more about current and upcoming theater productions and art installations on campus visit the FPAC

Kate Wulle, Retired Theater Faculty Member

From the Archives: Founders Day


This year, Moraine Valley Community College turns 50! February 18th is Founders Day, which commemorates the day in 1967 when residents voted “Yes” to establish a Class 1 junior college district in the Southwest suburbs of Chicago.

Sample ballot for the referendum that established the college

So why Moraine Valley? What’s a moraine anyway? A moraine is a geological phenomenon which occurs with the accumulation of glacial debris. The name reflects the landscape in which the college is situated: the place where the Valparaiso and Tinley moraines meet to form a valley. According to a document from the initial planning and development of the college, “The existence of these moraines influenced the direction of flow of the Chicago River… This geological history provides an explanation and background for the natural and distinctly beautiful hills and valleys found in the Palos Hills area where the college will be located.”

Former logo of Moraine Valley Community College

The College opened its doors to 1,210 students on September 16th, 1968. Classes were held in leased warehouses on 115th in Alsip. For students who enrolled in classes for the 1968-69 academic year, tuition cost $6.50 per credit hour. Classes were held at the Palos Hills location that we know today the following year, but the first permanent structure, Building A, was not opened until 1972.

Check out the library’s collection for more local history:

For more information on the history of Moraine Valley Community College, visit the College Archives website at http://ext.morainevalley.edu/collegearchives/.

Happy Founders Day!

On this date 50 years ago, district residents approved a referendum to create Moraine Valley Community College. This effort was spearheaded by the Oak Lawn Rotary. Moraine Valley will thank the Rotary for its efforts long ago by presenting the current members with a thank-you banner signed by faculty, staff and students (from the MVCC Public Relations Department).

All the News That’s Fit to Print… and Digitize

Last month The New York Times released its latest self-study, Journalism That Stands Apart: The Report of the 2020 Group, outlining its principles, priorities, and goals. By many accounts, The New York Times is hugely successful – $500 million in digital only revenue, more than one million print subscriptions – but the changing media landscape is forcing the news organization to rethink just about everything they do. The report highlights their drive to maintain the journalistic integrity and standards the paper is known for, while modernizing the way they tell stories and involve readers; who they hire and task with curatorial, writing, and editing responsibilities; how they train those individuals; and a more or less overall redefinition of successful journalism. Interestingly, some takeaways may resonate further than the newsroom and maybe even prove inspirational to organizations outside of the media.

Fact, Fiction, or Something Else: What Does the Artist Owe to History?

Don’t miss this event next week! It is part of our One Book program on Hamilton. Here’s the info:

Fact, Fiction, or Something Else: What Does the Artist Owe to History?
Thursday, February 23 11am-12:15pm, Library Lounge, Building L
The musical Hamilton draws directly from the historical record, but it clearly is not a documentary, which many historians have noted. Writers and artists such as Shakespeare, Dan Brown, and Anne Rice dramatize historic settings, characters, and famous events in their works. Sometimes they bring history to life and sometime they perpetuate historical myths. What does it mean to be “true” to the historical record? How do artists get it right? How can they get it wrong? What do they owe to the record? A panel of history and literature faculty will come together to explore these questions.

Jerry Bennett, Mayor of Palos Hills

Moraine Valley Community College celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year. To learn more about and to re-live some of what those five decades have been like, the college has been collecting oral histories. Each week this semester we will highlight one of the videos.

This week we hear from the Mayor of Palos Hill, Jerry Bennett. Having held office for 35 years he has seen amazing transformations at the college. The architecture and landscaping have made the college a showpiece for the city and for the area. Because of the academic reputation of the college and its commitment to the surrounding community, providing amazing opportunities for the south suburban area, Palos Hills is proud to be home to Moraine Valley Community College.

To enjoy more of these oral histories, along with historic photos and documents, visit the MVCC College Archives.

Jerry Bennett, Mayor of Palos Hills

Valentine’s Day & Chocolate

The National Retail Federation says about 50 percent of consumers will buy candy for Valentine’s Day 2017, spending about $1.7 billion on candy alone. Are you buying chocolate for Valentine’s Day?

Some books about chocolate available in the library:

The Emperors of Chocolate: Inside the Secret World of Hershey and Mars by Joël Glenn Brenner

The New Taste of Chocolate: A Cultural and Natural History of Cacao with Recipes by Maricel E. Presilla

The Essence of Chocolate: Recipes for Baking and Cooking with Fine Chocolate by John Scharffenberger and Robert Steinberg with Ann Krueger Spivack and Susie Heller; photography by Deborah Jones

Photo credit: “Chocolate-2” by jules is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Quiet Mouse Don’t Get Fed: Race and Oppression

Discussion the impact of the 2016 presidential election, micro-aggression, black lives matter and the meaning of race in today’s society. We will also look at racial discrimination and immigration as it is playing out in our world today.

“Quiet mouse don’t get fed:” race and oppression

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Demetrius Robinson, Manager of Student Life

Moraine Valley Community College celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year. To learn more about and to re-live some of what those five decades have been like, the college has been collecting oral histories. Each week this semester we will highlight one of the videos.

Demetrius Robinson describes Student Life on campus, before the S and U buildings were built, when activities were housed in the old College Center. He shares some of his favorite memories as times when the whole MVCC community came together in celebration. He remembers a party for the Chicago Bears trip to the Super Bowl and dressing as a clown to celebrate the passage of a referendum.

To enjoy more of these oral histories, along with historic photos and documents, visit the MVCC College Archives.

 

Demetrius Robinson, Manager of Student Life