Silver Screen Shakespeare

With the new Shakespeare Garden being dedicated on July 21st and the upcoming MVCC production of The Taming of the Shrew, we wanted to celebrate the greatness that was William Shakespeare! We’ve got a number of resources in the library that get you in touch with his works directly. You can check them out here.

Shakespeare’s works permeate much of our culture and influence so many movies and TV shows. There are a ton of movie adaptations, many of which aren’t obviously a Shakespeare work in disguise. To give you an idea, here is a listing by Mark Lawson of the 10 best screen adaptations of Shakespeare’s work.

We have many of these movies, along with some not listed, in the library available for checkout. The links below may lead you to a whole new interpretation of one of your favorite Shakespeare plays!

The Tempest

Tempest / Paul Mazursky (1982)

 

Romeo and Juliet

West Side Story / Robert Wise (1961)

Romeo + Juliet / Baz Luhrmann (1996)

Romeo Must Die / Andrzej Bartkowiak (2000)

 

Henry IV (parts 1 & 2)

My Own Private Idaho / Gus Van Sant (1991)

 

King Lear

A Thousand Acres / Jocelyn Moorhouse (1997)

 

Love’s Labour’s Lost

Love’s Labour’s Lost : a romantic musical comedy / Kenneth Branagh  (1999)

 

Coriolanus

Coriolanus / Ralph Fiennes  (2011)

Navigating a Stressful World with Mindfulness

Many of us experience stress in one form or another. Especially during finals week, it can be helpful to use tools to help keep us focused. In this lecture, Teresa Hannon discusses the use of meditation and mindfulness to help manage the stress of everyday life as part of Less Stress Week.  Teresa is a counselor at Moraine Valley Community College.

The audio of this discussion is available below:

 

Less Stress Week!

160990 Lib Less Stress digital sign final

 

Feeling the pressure of final projects and studying for exams? Check out the library’s less stress week! We’ll have a number of activities each day to help you relieve some of stress and anxiety of finals. From 10am to 3pm, Monday through Thursday, there will be presentations to attend and tables to stop by for an activity. Here’s a rundown of what’s happening.

 

Monday – Meditation and mindfulness with presentations at 10am and 2pm.

Tuesday – Yoga and stretching with sessions at 10:15 am and 1pm

Wednesday – Board Games from 10-3

Thursday – Origami and coloring

Student Life will also be around with snacks!

Come learn and try different ways to reduce stress while prepping for your finals. Reducing stress and anxiety around finals will help keep you focused and be better prepared for the task at hand. See you next week!

We Won’t Be Fooled Again!~

What makes this a little different from most other orange chocolates ...

An article is circulating today that highlights some essential information literacy concepts.  A group of journalists and scientists got together to do a study that purposefully created some bad information regarding the use of chocolate as a weight loss aid, and then succeeded in getting that bogus information published.  As students and faculty, we are serious information consumers.  We are taking in an increased amount of information, and consequently need to be able to assess and dismiss bad information.  The article that’s linked here highlights some of the flaws in ways that our information can be created and ultimately produced.  As information consumers, we must be aware that not all of our conventionally scholarly resources, like peer reviewed journals, are 100% credible every time.  It is important that we remain critical of the information we find, specifically in how it was created.

 

The articles outlines the process of how bad information can be created, and what kinds of steps people can take to sidestep traditional peer review practices.  Read the article, and then have some chocolate to balance out the feelings of sadness.  Science shows that chocolate makes you feel better, right?

 

http://io9.com/i-fooled-millions-into-thinking-chocolate-helps-weight-1707251800

Shake Off the End of the Semester!

 

Zumba

We have an exciting new addition to our collection at MVCC Library!  If the picture didn’t give it away, we now have a Zumba kit for check out!  If you’ve ever wanted to give the dance based workout craze a try in the privacy of your own home, now’s your chance!  The kit includes everything you’ll need to get the full Zumba experience, aside from the classroom environment of course.

  • 5 workout DVDs,
  • A program guide that offers some insight into how to best use the Zumba workouts,
  • 2 Zumba Toning Sticks.  (These produce a rattling sound, so you can feel like you’re making music while you’re working up a sweat)

The program guide outlines: tips and techniques for doing Zumba safely and correctly, a weekly workout planner, appropriate stretches, and some recipes for healthy eating.  While the guide does offer advice for working out safely and eating healthy meals, you should consult with a healthcare professional before starting a serious workout routine or making big changes to your diet.  This is especially true if you are new to exercising and/or if you are unfamiliar with creating a healthy, nutritious diet.

The DVDs have a range of intensity and skill level.  The most basic workout is called “Step by Step” which will walk you through the basic Zumba movements during the workout, followed by “Activate”, “Exhilarate”, “Zumba Toning”, and finally “Mix”.  The workout planner shows examples of how to mix up your workouts throughout the week, and when to take breaks.

The end of the semester is a great time to try something new, or pick up a hobby for the summer!  You can check out the kit in the library from our circulation desk to start shaking up your summer!

It’s Important to De-stress

 

Don’t be like Kitteh! Finals can be a tough time, but there are definitely ways to help make them a bit easier!  With final exams starting in a couple weeks (You can find the final exam schedule here), it’s time to start thinking about how to get ready.  Of course you’ll be studying quite a bit, but you should also plan to take breaks from that studying to keep fresh.

A study from the University of Illinois posits that taking a break during your study time can help keep you focused and increase your overall productivity.  The University of Illinois states “This study is consistent with the idea that the brain is built to detect and respond to change, Lleras said, and suggests that prolonged attention to a single task actually hinders performance.”  With this in mind, be sure to prepare for some distractions from your intense studying.

At this point, you may be wondering “What’s the most efficient way to set myself up to study and take short breaks?”.  Well, the best place to do that is the library!  You’ll likely be here to study anyway, but we have a number of ways for you to take a meaningful break.

One of them is our gaming collection.  If you didn’t already know, we have added a new collection of board games to the library, and they make the perfect distraction during your finals studies.  Currently, we have Settlers of Catan, Blockus, Ticket to Ride, Tsuro, Carcassonne, and Hey, That’s My Fish!  Many of these games are easy to learn and quick to play.  Just the diversion you’ll be looking for!

 

 

Beat End of the Semester Stress with Carcassonne!

We’re coming up on the end of the semester, which can be a stressful time. BUT!  Your library can help. As always, you can come in and work with us to get help finding those resources and understanding your assignments.  Also, you can come in to the library to combat that stress by unwinding with one of our games in our new board game collection!  We’ve been running a series of posts highlighting our collection, and this post will feature Carcassonne.

Some consider Carcassonne to be a “Gateway” game.  The rules are fairly simple, the gameplay is fast, and players are never removed from play.  If you’ve not played many board games before, this one might be a good entry point for you!

In the game, you take turns placing tiles to create a midieval landscape.  Each tile represents a different entity of a typical midieval kingdom.  Players compete to build cities, cloisters, roads, and fields by connecting the tiles.  Each side of a tile represents either a road, field, city or cloister and must be matched up with sides of other tiles that match.  The walls of a city must match up with another and a road must connect with another road, for example.

To score points, you must claim parts of the map with your followers as it is being built.  As you place your tile, you must determine if you intend to place your follower on a portion of it.  As cities, roads and cloisters are finished, the the players who have claimed them gain points.  You must anticipate your opponents strategies to claim territories for yourself and keep them from scoring.

 

Come on over the MVCC Library and bust some stress by putting your planning and strategy skills to the test with some of your friend!

 

In case you missed some of the previous posts, we’ve covered Settlers of Catan, Hey, That’s My Fish!, Tsuro,  Ticket to Ride , and Blokus

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8255

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8019

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=7993

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8338

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8412

Blockus: Fitting it All Together

 

 

You already know that the MVCC Library is awesome, but here’s another reason to add to the list of why.  We have a new game collection that is available to you in the library.  Just come to the circulation desk to check them out!  We’re highlighting each one in a series of blog posts, and this one is dedicated to Blockus.

 

If you are familiar with the game Tetris, Blockus will seem familiar at a glance.  However, it gets much more complicated.  The board is a grid of 400 squares that fit your pieces.  You will get a set of 21 tiles that are based on free polyominioes, meaning that you’ll have pieces made up of squares.  These will be made up from one to five squares, each in a unique formation.

 

The gameplay is turn-based.  On your turn, you play one piece.  That’s it!  Simple, right?  Not exactly…  Your piece must connect to one of your other pieces, but only at the corner.  No two squares on any piece of the same color can be side by side.  You can, however, put those squares next to another color.  If you can’t fit a piece on the board, you’ll have to pass your turn.  The game ends when no more pieces can be played.

 

The scoring is based on how many squares in the individual pieces are left off of the board.  Each square is a negative point, so a piece made up of four squares is negative four points.  You’ll have to plan your strategy while reading your opponents moves to be able to get all of your pieces to fit on the board. Put those Tetris skills to the test!

 

In case you missed some of the previous posts, we’ve covered Settlers of Catan, Hey, That’s My Fish!, Tsuro, and Ticket to Ride

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8255

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8019

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=7993

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8338

That’s the Ticket!

 

Image result for ticket to ride images

 

Hopefully you’ve heard, but in case you haven’t, MVCC Library has an awesome new collection of games to check out!  They are available at our circulation desk to be loaned and played in the library!  This series of blog posts is designed to highlight our games, and this entry is all about Ticket to Ride.

 

You are a railroad tycoon, and the objective of the game is to expand your railways before the other tycoons get a chance to lay down their tracks across the U.S.A.  The board is laid out with major stations across the United States mapped out with indicators showing the railways that connect them, and how long that railway is.  To connect two stations together you must collect enough train car cards of the same color to fill in the number of spots.  Keep an eye out for the Rainbow Car!  It counts towards the total for any color!

 

Each completed railway is adds to your score, with the number of points increasing for a line requiring a higher number of train car cards.  There are also objective cards that award points if you are able to connect the two stations listed on the card. Having the longest consecutive railway on the board will also boost your total. Beware, though!  Other players are vying for some of the same lines that you’ve got your eye on, so don’t give away your strategy!  You might just find a big caboose in your way!

 

In case you missed some of the previous posts, we’ve covered Settlers of Catan, Hey, That’s My Fish!, and Tsuro

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8255

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8019

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=7993

Tsuro: Ride the Winds of Fate

 

Image result for tsuro

If you have not yet heard, your Moraine Valley Library has a new collection of games to check out!  They are available at our circulation desk to be loaned and played in the library!  We’re doing a series of blogs highlighting each new game, and this week we’ve got Tsuro on the docket.

 

Tsuro is as beautiful as it complex.  In it, you are a dragon riding on the winds of fate, and each player takes turns creating the path that these winds take.  Initially, you place your dragon on a tick along the border of the board.  Each player takes turns lying down tiles that set out a path before their token.  Your dragon must follow the path it is connected to.  If the path that is created leads your dragon off of the board, or into a collision with another token, you’re out of the game!  Be the last one on the board to claim your victory.

 

The game requires a bit of planning and strategy.  As the board becomes crowded with tiles, you must take care to keep your dragon from getting put on a path to destruction.  You must be aware of all the interconnected pathways and know their outcomes to make the right moves.  Other players are also affected by your tile placement, so if you play your tiles right, you can sweep someone off the board while moving yourself to safety.

 

The games can be short, lasting between 10-20 minutes depending on the number of players involved.  Each iteration of the game is unique, so it stays interesting even when played multiple times in a row!  It’s easy to learn, with very few rules, but figuring out all of the possible paths can be complex.  Come try it for yourself at the circulation desk in the library!

 

In case you missed some of the previous posts, we’ve covered Settlers of Catan and Hey, That’s My Fish!

 

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=8019

http://morainestudents.com/searchtips/?p=7993