Monologues from African-American History

Hear their stories. Learn about prominent black historical figures followed by a discussion on the history, role and impact they had on society.
Featured figures include:
-Mary Eliza Mahoney
-Jean Baptiste du Sable
-Gwen Ifill
-Aretha Franklin
-Muhammad Ali
-Shirley Chisholm
-Thurgood Marshall
-Dr. Mae C Jamieson
-Alvin Ailey

Live Museum and Monologues Project

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Measuring, Mapping and Observing the World: House of Wisdom Scientists (video)

This presentation discusses the quest of ninth century House of Wisdom scholars to check early scientific observations and to develop new methods of scientific research. It looks at the methods they used to calculate the circumference of the Earth as well as the position of the earth, planets, stars, and the moon. The place of the observatories in the Muslim world is also addressed. This lecture is part of the MOSAICS Building Bridges Program.

Measuring, Mapping and Observing the World: House of Wisdom Scientists

The audio of this discussion is available below:

A Short History of Modern Pakistan

Pakistan’s history has impacted global events. This complicated story is often misunderstood. This talk will explore this history. This event is part of our One Book, One College Programming.

A Short History of Modern Pakistan

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Dear Mama, Are you alright? (video)

A discussion to understand the exhaustion experienced by black mothers in the face of multilayered oppression. The discussion will provide strategies of support such as: self-preservation and self-care for black mothers within society. This event is organized by the Black History Month committee.

Dear Mama, Are you alright?

The audio of this discussion is available below:

“Knowing Keeps us Free:” Washington Post Super Bowl spot

There have been many complaints about the boring commercials during last night’s Super Bowl, but for many of us, one commercial stood out among the rest. This was the spot from the Washington Post (narrated by Tom Hanks) that highlights the importance of journalism in a free democracy. It included images of reporters who have been killed over the last few years including Jamal Khashoggi, who is alleged to have been killed at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul last year.

Here’s an article about the images and people highlighted in the spot, “The Washington Post airs its first Super Bown spot.”

Washington Post Super Bowl message: Democracy Dies in Darkness
Because knowing empowers us. Knowing helps us decide. Knowing keeps us free. For more than 140 years The Washington Post has been a key part of democracy, holding government accountable and safeguarding the interests of readers.

Pop Culture & Social Change: Faculty panel (video)

Movies, TV, comic books, novels, and music have helped to drive social change. Discussions about civil rights, LGBTQ rights, protesting war, supporting veterans, and many other topics have been explored through popular culture. The “entertainment” industry has been a form of self-reflection for society. What kinds of changes have been driven by popular culture? When we use popular culture in the classroom, what can we learn? This event is part of our One Book, One College program on the book Ms. Marvel.

Pop Culture & Social Change: Faculty panel

The audio of this discussion is available below:

The Alchemist Chemist: The Unnecessary Divide in the Life of Jabbir Ibn Hayyan

In this lecture, Dr. Amani Wazwaz presents the life and achievements of the eighth century Muslim scholar Jabir Ibn Hayyan. The lecture introduces the role that the alchemist has played in cultural imagination and the place that Jabir ibn Hayyan has in the history of chemistry. This lecture is part of the MOSAICS Building Bridges Program.

The Alchemist Chemist: The Unnecessary Divide in the Life of Jabbir Ibn Hayyan

The audio of this discussion is available below: