Academic Gowns, an 800 Year Tradition

This Friday (May 17) is graduation when we honor Moraine Valley’s newest alumni!

When a student graduates, it is traditionally the faculty to bestow the degree on the students. The faculty as the keepers of their academic disciplines confirm that the students have completed their course work and have earned the degree. This is why the faculty process into the ceremony in their fancy robes.

Of course, this always leads us to to the question about the crazy, colorful, and sometimes eccentric looking robes worn by faculty members and graduates. The academic regalia (as it is known) is an 800 year old tradition dating back to middle-ages Europe. At that time, monks were the keepers of knowledge, and they lived in old, drafty monasteries. Their robes were practical at first (to keep warm), but over time, the robes evolved into academic fashion statements.

If you are interested in learning a bit more about the meaning and history behind academic dress, take a look at this video from the UCLA Newsroom: Decoding Graduation Caps and Gowns

UCLA explores the meaning and mystery behind graduation attire.

ADHD: A Comprehensive Look

Last week the Pschology Department held a panel discussion on ADHD. This was a great panel that I wanted to pass along below.

Also, our library has many excellent resources on ADHD that I wanted to link up: ADHD Resources.

ADHD : A Comprehensive Look
This panel by the MVCC Psychology Dept. discusses various topics concerning Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Subjects covered by the panelists include: neurological foundations, symptoms, diagnostic and assessment methods, contributing factors and treatment options, school interventions, and suggestions for families, teachers and students.

Raise Awareness for Suicide Prevention

MVCC’s Recreation Management/Recreation Therapy Club are hosting an event to raise awareness for suicide prevention (details below). This is an important topic, and it is great that our students are working on this issue.

I wanted to share a couple of titles from the library’s collection that may be offer support and additional research for this topic.

 

Recreation Management/Recreation Therapy Club Advocates to:
Raise Awareness for Suicide Prevention

HIGH NOON IS HIGH TIME TO RAISE AWARENESS AND HELP PREVENT SUICIDE
Join us on Wednesday, May 8, 2013 from Noon to 1:00p.m for an awareness walk!
Meet at Entrance Door of Building M Facing 111th Street
5K Walk on Campus Trail of Perimeter Road
No fee or registration required.

Walking the Walk: My Enduring Sustainability Journey featuring Stephenie Presseller

A new video that is part of our TLC event.
Walking the Walk: My Enduring Sustainability Journey
Stephenie Presseller
Childhood places, experiences with inspirational people, and life choices push us in new directions in life. Stephenie Presseller takes us on her ongoing journey that has led her to become the first sustainability manager at Moraine Valley. This is an amazingly beautiful, challenging, and winding road that invites us all to come along and walk the walk toward sustainability.

Silence is Loud Discussion on Gay, Lesbian, Transgender Issues

In 2007, our library held a discussion organized by the GLOW Club (gay, lesbian, or whatever) on LGTB issues. I was realizing that we are almost to the 6 year anniversary since we held this discussion. This discussion included MVCC students, faculty members, and a representative from a local PFLAG chapter. This was a great discussion that supported MVCC’s core value, Embrace Diversity.

Silence is Loud Discussion Held in the Library (held May 2, 2007)
The Library hosted the panel discussion Silence is Loud today. This event was sponsored by Moraine Valley’s GLOW (gay, lesbian, or whatever) Student group.

The audio of this event is available below:

Angels in America at MVCC

Angels in AmericaLater this week, an MVCC production of Tony Kushner’s groundbreaking play about Reagan-era America during the height of the AIDS epidemic debuts at the John and Angeline Oremus Theater here on campus.

This year (in fact, this month) marks twenty years since Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part 1: Millennium Approaches won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

Three years earlier, in 1990, the play premiered in workshop form at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles. Here’s one of the earliest reviews from that production, from way back when the play was just a lowly work-in-progress and before it capitulated Kushner (who incidentally snagged an Oscar Nom this year for penning the screenplay for Lincoln) to the forefront of American theater: “STAGE REVIEW A Novel ‘Millennium’” (Sylvie Drake, Los Angeles Times; May 21, 1990). (I found this review using ProQuest National Newspapers by going to the Library homepage –> Research Tools –> News [under Databases By Subject] –> National Newspapers).

The library holds multiple copies of Angels in America–parts 1 and 2–along with some literary criticism. Find them all listed in the online catalog here.

For more lit crit, MLA International Bibliography is always a good choice (Library homepage –> Research Tools –> Literature Resources [under Databases By Subject] –> MLA International Bibliography).

From the Archives: Future of Water in Chicagoland

Since today is Earth Day and we are all still recovering from the recent floods, I thought it would be timely to throw out a link back to one of our podcasts from 2011.  We welcomed Josh Ellis from the Metropolitan Planning Council. Mr. Ellis discussed our region’s water problems.

Follow this link to listen to the podcast:

Future of Water in Chicagoland:
http://ext.morainevalley.edu/librarynews/?p=588
How long can we continue to rely on Lake Michigan water and what’s the impact of our water? How does our water use impact real estate and industrial development? What are the emerging demands for green infrastructure and water use? What has the impact of invasive species been on the area? We welcomed Josh Ellis of the Metropolitan Planning Council who answered these questions and discussed water use in our region.

Earth Day 2013

earthday2013

If you’re confused because you see lots of people wearing green on campus today, but St. Patrick’s Day was over a month ago, it’s because today is Earth Day. And it’s also the beginning of Earth Week. There will be a number of Earth Week-related events and activities on campus this week.

Here at the library we have a lecture scheduled for today at 12:30pm.

Sustainability Around the Globe: For Folks with Short Attention Spans
Intensive English Language students offer short poster presentations about sustainability topics from their home countries. Tour the world in a matter of minutes while learning neat facts about environmental, social and economic issues.

We also have lots of materials for you to check out. Here is just a small sampling of what’s available.

For general information about Earth Day check out
The Official Earth Day Guide to Planet Repair

To get a little historical perspective we have
Before Earth Day: the Origins of American Environmental Law, 1945-1970

And if you’re interested in making protecting the environment more than just a “one week out the year” kind of thing, you can check out
Best Green Careers: Explore Opportunites in this Rapid Growing Field!

But there’s lots more in the collection. A good place to start if you want to browse around is the subject heading, Environmental Protection.

Earth Day 2013 – The Face of Climate Change

Podcast Archive: 10 Most Pivotal Events in Middle East History

I thought it might be interesting to pull out a podcast from the library’s archive of podcast. Here is a link to a discussion we held five years ago about the history of the Middle East. Our past podcasts are enjoyable and thought-provoking.

10 Most Pivotal Events in Middle East History Podcast
http://ext.morainevalley.edu/librarynews/?p=355
On April 9th, 2009 the library hosted a special discussion entitled the 10 Most Pivotal Events in Middle East History featuring faculty members Merri Fefles and Jim McIntyre.

Debating the Iraq War as We Started Bombing Baghdad

March 19th 2003
“Can War Be Just” Panel , March 19, 2003

Ten years ago, our library had scheduled a faculty panel discussion on the Just War Theory. For several months, President George W. Bush had been talking about a preemptive strike against Saddam Hussein . We decided that a discussion on the justification for war would be useful.   We didn’t know it, but we had inadvertently scheduled this panel on the exact day (March 19, 2003) that the US started bombing Baghdad.  Over 300 students packed into the library for this event. Our faculty members were great. Four years later (in 2007), we reconvened this panel for further discussion. I have pasted the link to the podcast from the 2007 event below.

Ten years later, there are still many questions about the Iraq War. This PBS News Hour article addressees some of these: Ten Years Later, What Lessons Can We Take From the Iraq War?

Our Library also has many sources about the war (click here “Iraq War” to view the sources in the library catalog).

Listen to Podcast: The Iraq War Four Years Later: A Panel Discussion Reconvened (Date of Event: March 6, 2007)
Description: Four years ago, on March 19, 2003, the Moraine Valley Library held a panel discussion about the just war theory. Through eerie coincidence, this event fell on the very day that the US started bombing Iraq. Now, four years later, this panel of experts reconvenes to talk about the last four years and the future. As in the book, 1984, war has become an ongoing part of life.

Faculty members Merri Fefles, Andrew Zbeeb, Bill Droel, and Deron Schreck
Merri Fefles, Andrew Zbeeb, Bill Droel, and Deron Schreck in 2003.