The Books that Created Dracula

Some excellent detective work on the origins of Dracula!

“The London Library today unveiled a fascinating discovery that sheds new light on how Dracula was researched and written. We’ve found 26 books that are almost certainly the original copies that Bram Stoker used to help research his enduring classic.

Philip Spedding, the Library’s Development Director who made the discovery, commented: “Bram Stoker was a member of The London Library but until now we have had no indication whether or how he used our collection. Today’s discovery changes that and we can establish beyond reasonable doubt that numerous books still on our shelves are the very copies that he was using to help write and research his masterpiece.” (See London Library’s “The Books that Created Dracula“)

Philip Spedding looks at the books discovered in The London Library that were used by Bram Stoker to research Dracula

The Books that Created Dracula

The Books That Created Dracula from The London Library on Vimeo.

The Bottomless Pinocchio, Misinformation, and the Fight for Truth

Since yesterday’s post about the War on Truth, a few more items have come our way.

First, the Washington Post’s fact-checkers have introduced a new category called “the Bottomless Pinocchio” for constantly repeated false claims. Take a look a the video below or visit this article,
“Meet the Bottomless Pinocchio, a new rating for a false claim repeated over and over again”.

Second, the first episode of the (Mis)Informed Podcast has been released. This focuses on fact-checking political sources. You can listen at the player below or read more here, “(Mis)informed podcast: Who is fact-checking actually for?”

The Botomless Pinocchio:

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(Mis)Informed Podcast:

The War on Truth! Defending Free & Open Journalism

Librarians and journalists share many values. Namely, the belief that free and open information is vital to democracy and an open society. This week a few, year-end announcements from our colleagues in the world of journalism were made that should be highlighted.

First, Time magazine announced that their person (people) of the year is “the Guardians and the War on Truth.”
The video pasted below outlines those involved.

Second, PolitiFact announced their “Lie of the Year” which is the online smear machine trying to take down Parkland students.
Finally, PolitiFact also released “Trump’s 10 top falsehood of 2018” which offers an interesting perspective into our current political landscape.

Here’s the video from Time:

Your Apps Know Where You Were Last Night…and They are Selling It

You are being watched!!

The New York Times has a great interactive piece online today that details ways that your apps are tracking you and then selling your location data to advertisers. The level of detail is frightening. You can find the story here:  Your Apps Know Where You Were Last Night, and They’re Not Keeping It Secret

You can learn more about the background to this story on the podcast “The Daily” here:

The Business of Selling Your Location
Smartphone apps track a staggering amount of data about our whereabouts every day. That data has become a hot commodity.
“A New York Times investigation has found that the information being collected about us through apps on our smartphones is far more extensive than most of us imagine — or are aware we have consented to.”

If you want to better control what your apps know about you check out: How to Stop Apps From Tracking Your Location. 

Remembering President George H.W. Bush

On November 30th, the 41st President, George H.W. Bush passed away. As the nation remembers his years in office, take a look at these resources.

Here are a some biographies:
George Bush : the life of a Lone Star Yankee by Herbert S. Parmet

41 : a portrait of my father by George W. Bush (The 43rd President writes a biography of his father, the 41st President.)

George H.W. Bush by Timothy Naftali

Also, here is a discussion from the NPR Politics Podcast:

WELCOME TO MARS!

NASA’s InSight Mars lander touched down on Mars on November 26, 2018.  The Elysium Planitia, located on the western side of Mars, was the landing site.  NASA scientists chose this site because of its flat surface.

The InSight will monitor numerous aspects of the red planet and send daily reports back to planet Earth.  The Mars lander is similar to “an unmanned research station” that will help scientists analyze how earth and other rocky planets formed.

Job well done NASA!

Art Institute Online

The Art Institute of Chicago has recently enhanced the online availability of its digital archives, making much more of its collection available for online viewing. More than 44,000 images of its collection are now available online with unrestricted access. The images are all downloadable under a Creative Commons license. Image viewing has also been enhanced, allowing the user to see the image in much greater detail, even down to the brushstroke level.

Explore the collection here. You can browse through varies genres or use the search function to look for more specific pieces.

To find out even more about the collection of the Art Institute check out these books from the MVCC library.

President Roosevelt digital archives

As reported by the New York Times on October 17, 2018, the Library of Congress now holds the largest collection of President Theodore Roosevelt’s papers and includes 276,000 documents and over 460,000 digital images that date back to 1759. The collection began in 1917 when Roosevelt first sent items to the Library of Congress for “safekeeping.” These items later became a permanent gift from Roosevelt and the collection grew over the years from the contributions of relatives and a literary executor. The Library of Congress Roosevelt holdings are digitized and accessible online and include diaries, speeches, letters, and other documents. Other collections of Roosevelt’s papers are located at Harvard University Library and The FDR Presidential Library. Use the links below to learn more about the Library of Congress and other Roosevelt collections and to view and search through thousands of digital images.

https://www.loc.gov/collections/theodore-roosevelt-papers/about-this-collection/

http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/archives/collections.html

https://library.harvard.edu/collections/theodore-roosevelt-collection

 

National Voter Registration Day (September 25)

Today (Sept 25) is National Voter Registration Day!! You can visit the National Voter Registration Day website to register to vote and find out about voting in your area.
National Voter Registration Image

From their website:
“National Voter Registration Day is a national holiday celebrating our democracy. It was first observed in 2012 and has been growing in popularity every year since. Held on the fourth Tuesday of September, National Voter Registration Day will be observed on Tuesday, September 25th this year. The holiday has been endorsed by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS). It is further supported by the National Association of State Election Directors (NASED).”

New Words to Use in Scrabble

The new edition of the official Scrabble dictionary has added hundreds of new words, such as sheeple, bitcoin, emoji, and puggle. Other big news in the Scrabble world is that the word “OK” is now acceptable. Scrabble has been around since the 1930s but it needs to change as language changes.  The library does not have any books about Scrabble specifically, but we do have a book about board games: It’s All a Game: The History of Board Games from Monopoly to Settlers of Catan by Tristan Donovan. And the library has many dictionaries for you to use, including online access to the Oxford English Dictionary.