Summer Bites

The warm weather has finally arrived in Chicago.  Baseball, barbecue, beaches, and bugs are part of the hot weather season.

Unfortunately, the downside of this season is the insects and the dangerous diseases they transmit.  The New York Times recently reported that “the number of people who get diseases transmitted by mosquito, tick and flea bites has more than tripled in the United States in recent years.”

The CDC site on this summertime hazard has additional information on how people in the Midwest can protect themselves from these treacherous bites.

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo

We finally have a print copy of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill Twiss. The book was announced (and released) on March 18th during an episode of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver with some controversy. Independent booksellers were blindsided by the release and questioned business ethics as the book was first made available to Amazon.¹ The larger conversation was around the fact that the book was published as a parody of Marlon Bundo’s A Day in the Life of the Vice President, written by Charlotte Pence and illustrated by Karen Pence. Both books star the Pence family pet, Marlon Bundo, but one is a biography of the Vice President, while the other is about same-sex marriage.

The release of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo was political, serving as Oliver’s response to Mike Pence’s indirect support of anti-gay organizations.² The plot is about gay marriage and pictures contain cues for adults. At the same time, the book introduces broader themes that go beyond this specific political situation. Twiss writes about the essentials of democracy and diversity, ideas that are universal regardless of who is in power. You can checkout the book in print or electronically from our library.

  1. Green, Alex. “Booksellers Outraged by Chronicle’s Rollout of John Oliver Book.” Publishers Weekly, 26 March 2018, https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/bookselling/article/76440-booksellers-outraged-by-chronicle-s-rollout-of-john-oliver-book.html. Accessed 26 April 2018.
  2. “Mike Pence: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO).” YouTube, uploaded by LastWeek Tonight, 18 March 2018, https://youtu.be/rs2RlZQVXBU.

New Name in Sports

Our local professional sports stadium is getting a new name. After the end of this current MLS season, Bridgeview’s Toyota Park will become SeatGeek Stadium. The 20,000 seat facility opened in 2006 and is the home to Major League Soccer’s Chicago Fire and to National Women’s Soccer League’s Chicago Red Stars. Besides the new naming rights, SeatGeek, the online ticket broker, will also work with the stadium’s management to bring more events to Bridgeview including concerts, music festivals, and international sporting events.

Naming stadiums after companies is nothing new. Chicago Cubs owner and chewing gum manufacturer William Wrigley named Wrigley Field back in 1926. But selling off just the right to name a stadium, without any other ownership involved, has become more and more common in recent years. While often very expensive for corporations, naming rights also garner lots of exposure for the brand through on-camera views and audio mentions.

If you are interested in reading more about this topic, here are few resources you might find helpful. To read more about naming rights in sports in general, have a look at these articles from our Academic Search Complete database. For a more Chicago area stadium focus, try these Chicago Tribune articles. Finally, to learn even more about sports stadiums, including some local Chicago ones, this search from our library catalog will be helpful.

 

 

 

World Down Syndrome Day

  • World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), March 21, is a global awareness day which has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012. Down Syndrome is  defined as “the nucleus of each cell contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, half of which are inherited from each parent. Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21.”

    Check out this YouTube video of  “50 Mums/50 Kids/1 Extra Chromosome”.

     

     

 

 

 

 

 

Check out this YouTube video of a group of “50 Mums/50 Kids/1 Extra Chromsome”.

Kathrine Switzer and the Boston Marathon

 

  • This year’s Boston Marathon will be on April 16.  This race began in 1897.  It has undergone many historical changes in the course of its history, some tragic and some reflecting the social transformations that have taken place in America over the last 50 years.

    I recently had the opportunity to hear Kathrine Switzer, the first woman to officially run the Boston Marathon, describe her experience in 1967. Her story mirrors the struggle that American women faced in the 1960s and in some cases still face in 2018.  It is important to be familiar with the historical female figures that helped change the lives of American women.

    To learn more about women and sports check out the MVCC catalog or the MVCC library databases.

WHO WILL PAY YOUR STUDENT LOAN?

Can the student loan problem be solved in the United States?  A recent blog post by Marshall Steinbaum, a Research Director and Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, proposed that the U.S government should erase everyone’s student debt.  Can it really be done?
Also, a short analysis of this problem from the  CNN Money webpage.

ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

Many Americans are conditioned to believe that antibiotics will solve most minor illnesses. The general public is puzzled by the growing reluctance of medical providers to prescribe antibiotics to their patients.  This hesitation is grounded in scientific research.  There has been solid evidence to support the limitation of antibiotics.

Antibiotic resistance is the ability of bacteria to resist the effects of an antibiotic.  A resistance occurs when bacteria change in a way that reduces the effectiveness of drugs designed to cure or prevent infections.The bacteria survive and continue to multiply causing more harm.”

Want to find out more about this medical phenomena? The MVCC library has numerous books to check out.

Use the MVCC Databases if you want  more information. The Nursing and Biological Sciences link will provide numerous academic journals, magazines and newspapers.

 

Reputable News Sources

Sometimes it becomes a bit difficult to know how to evaluate our news sources. Some news organizations have a more liberal bent while others definitely lean more conservative. Some can be relied upon for factual reporting while others contain more fabricated information. This infographic provides a pretty easy to read layout of where different news organizations fall on a scale of how reputable they are. If you’d like to see a larger version click here.

 

 

THE FLU

The United States experienced a serious pandemic in 1918 and 1919. During the 1918 “Spanish flu”  that killed up to 50 million people, many were reported to have died within hours of showing their first symptoms. The virus caused between 20-40 million deaths worldwide. It infected over 28% of the U.S. population and almost 700,000 Americans died from the flu during this time period. Most of the victims were between the ages of 20 and 40.  The medical profession had no idea how to treat the disease. 

One hundred years later, the United States is faced with another alarming flu season. Flu deaths are on the rise, including children and young adults. Fortunately in 2018, the medical experts have more medical tools at their disposal.
For additional information on staying healthy as well as interesting facts about this seasonal disease, check out the following sites.

 

Gretchen Carlson: How We Can End Sexual Harassment at Work

With the recent revelations of sexual harassment and assault in politics, the media, and entertainment, the following talk from Gretchen Carlson highlights issues and connects with our One Book program on the book We Believe You.

Description from TED: When Gretchen Carlson spoke out about her experience of workplace sexual harassment, it inspired women everywhere to take their power back and tell the world what happened to them. In a remarkable, fierce talk, she tells her story — and identifies three specific things we can all do to create safer places to work. “We will no longer be underestimated, intimidated or set back,” Carlson says. “We will stand up and speak up and have our voices heard. We will be the women we were meant to be.”

How We Can End Sexual Harassment at Work

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