A New Form of News: Songs, Poems, Games, and More from the Post

This week the Washington Post Magazine released their alternative storytelling issue online. This is an interesting information literacy & journalistic endeavor trying to break the mold of the “6000 word story” by using music, games, mad libs, graphic novels, poetry and more to share news.

You can learn more about the goals of this issue here: The Washington Post Magazine Publishes an Alternative Storytelling Issue.

Here’s a link to a short videos about musician Ben Folds writing a song about Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

Ben Folds Writes a Song About Rod Rosenstein

MLA and APA Citation Information

Classes have started. You see on the syllabus that you will need to provide MLA or APA citations for an assignment or for a paper. Maybe that is new to you—or maybe you don’t remember the details from your high school classes. The library can help! You can stop by the library and talk to a librarian about citation. Or, go to the “Research Tools” page on the library website. Click “Citing Sources” in the middle of the Research Tools page (under Featured Services). The Citing Sources Guide has a variety of links and instructional videos that show citation examples for journal articles, web pages, books, and many other sources. As always, help is available from the librarians or from the Speaking and Writing Center.

“Insightful” Google Searches

Do you always accept the top Google results as factual? Are you sure? An old standby in the research world is now ready to give you some help. Encyclopaedia Britannica has a new Chrome extension, “Britannica Insights,” that adds information to the top right of the results page when you search for something. There are limits, of course. Britannica admits it works best for scientific or historical information.

Read more about it: Chicago Tribune, Wired, and The Verge

Choose Privacy Week: Know Your Privacy Rights

Happy “Choose Privacy Week”!!! Libraries around the world celebrate May 1-7 as Choose Privacy Week which is a time for libraries to educate and advocate for the importance of privacy in our democracy.

The Choose Privacy Week website has a resources page outlining tips and tools you can use to ensure your online privacy such as:

Here’s the description from the Choose Privacy Week Website!:
The American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom established Choose Privacy Week in 2010 to help libraries work with their communities in navigating the complicated but vital issues of privacy rights. Privacy has long been a cornerstone of library services in America and a right that librarians defend every day. “

Here’s a video from a few years ago on the importance of privacy.

Vanishing Liberties: The Rise of State Surveillance in the Digital Age

Vanishing Liberties: The Rise of State Surveillance in the Digital Age from 20K Films on Vimeo.

MLA and APA Citation Help

It’s that time of the year again. As you are finishing your paper, you will need to properly format your citations using MLA or APA style. Help is available on the library website on the Research Tools page. Click “Citing Sources” in the middle of the Research Tools page (under Featured Services). The Citing Sources Guide has a variety of links that show citation examples for journal articles, web pages, books, and many other sources. As always, help is also available from the librarians or from the Speaking and Writing Center.

Ask the FCC to Support Net Neutrality

Libraries across US are speaking up today in support of Net Neutrality. The FCC is moving to create a two-tiered system (fast lane vs slow lane) on the Internet. For decades, libraries and librarians have stood up for privacy and fairness in accessing information. You can contact the FCC and lawmakers here: Battle for the Net.

This impacts all of us and will have implications for Moraine Valley students who may not have access to technology at home or who cannot pay additional money to access the fast lane. This is an important issue, and we should take note.

What is net neutrality?
“Net neutrality is the principle that Internet providers like Comcast & Verizon should not control what we see and do online. In 2015, startups, Internet freedom groups, and 3.7 million commenters won strong net neutrality rules from the US Federal Communication Commission (FCC). The rules prohibit Internet providers from blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization—”fast lanes” for sites that pay, and slow lanes for everyone else” (from Battle for the Net website).

Here are a couple of videos that explain the issue:

Why Net Neutrality Makes the Internet Great

Net Neutrality: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (from 2014, for mature viewers)