Free Event: Supercomputing at Argonne National Lab

We are excited to share information on the first discussion in our STEM series:

Science & Computer Science in the Argonne Leadership Computer Facility featuring Ben Lenard, Argonne National Laboratory
Wednesday, October 11th: Noon-1 PM, Library Lounge, Building L
Ben will talk about how supercomputers at LCF help to solve problems within the world, from physics to medicine.
Ben is responsible for overseeing the administration and improvement of database systems in the ALCF’s supercomputing environment. These databases are critical to many of the facility’s support services, including job scheduling, job accounting, and business intelligence. In 2016, Ben deployed the IBM Data Server Manager to help streamline database administration tasks. With this tool in place, Ben has a better idea of how the databases are being used, while developers have an improved method for identifying and addressing any performance issues with their queries. In addition to his day-to-day responsibilities, Ben has been strong advocate for the ALCF and for computer science, volunteering for events like the Hour of Code and Argonne’s public open house. He is also currently pursuing a PhD in Computer and Information Sciences at DePaul University. Prior to Argonne Ben worked in the financial services industry for 13 years as well as academia for 2 years.

Break Video: Civil Engineering

Happy winter break! Kick back and watch a video from our fall public events.
——————–
Civil Engineering is a diverse profession that offers you variety in multiple sub-disciplines involving critical thinking, problem solving, team work and adventure. This lecture will discuss the science, mathematics, exploration of different components and benefits of becoming a Civil Engineer. Kimberly Hastings is Resident Engineer with an emphasizes in Structural Engineering. Currently managing and overseeing construction of a large rail project for the largest inland port in the United States. This event is part of the STEM series.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go with Civil Engineering!

Oh, the Places You’ll Go with Civil Engineering! (video)

Civil Engineering is a diverse profession that offers you variety in multiple sub-disciplines involving critical thinking, problem solving, team work and adventure. This lecture will discuss the science, mathematics, exploration of different components and benefits of becoming a Civil Engineer. Kimberly Hastings is Resident Engineer with an emphasizes in Structural Engineering. Currently managing and overseeing construction of a large rail project for the largest inland port in the United States. This event is part of the STEM series.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go with Civil Engineering!

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Interested in Civil Engineering? Attend our free talk!

Don’t miss this special event:

Oh, the Places You’ll Go with Civil Engineering!
Nov 15th, 12:30pm, Building L, Library Lounge
Description: Civil Engineering is a diverse profession that offers you variety in multiple sub-disciplines involving critical thinking, problem solving, team work and adventure. This lecture will discuss the science, mathematics, exploration of different components and benefits of becoming a Civil Engineer. Kimberly Hastings is Resident Engineer with an emphasizes in Structural Engineering. Currently managing and overseeing construction of a large rail project for the largest inland port in the United States. This event is part of the STEM series.

Don’t Miss Our Final STEM Lecture on Engineering

Interested in engineering? Don’t miss our final STEM lecture for the fall semester, which will be next week.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go with Civil Engineering!
Nov 15th, 12:30pm, Building L, Library Lounge
Description: Civil Engineering is a diverse profession that offers you variety in multiple sub-disciplines involving critical thinking, problem solving, team work and adventure. This lecture will discuss the science, mathematics, exploration of different components and benefits of becoming a Civil Engineer. Kimberly Hastings is Resident Engineer with an emphasizes in Structural Engineering. Currently managing and overseeing construction of a large rail project for the largest inland port in the United States. This event is part of the STEM series.

X-ray Crystallography: Shining a Light on Protein Structure (STEM Talk)

Proteins carry out many important cellular functions such as cellular signaling, molecular transport, and catalyzing metabolic reactions. The structure of a protein can often give useful insights into how it carries out its function. X-ray crystallography is a technique used by biologists to determine the atomic structure of proteins. Dr. David Neau describes the technique and show some examples of how a protein’s structure reveals insights into its function. David B. Neau, Ph.D. is Staff Scientist, Northeastern Collaborative Access Team, Dept. of Chemistry, Cornell University. This event is part of the STEM series.

X-ray crystallography: Shining a Light on Protein Structure

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Fall STEM Series: Engineering, Atmospheric Chemistry, Protein Biology

Interested in a career in science? Don’t miss our STEM lecture series this fall!  People who work in STEM fields will talk about their work and give tips to students interested in working in these areas.

This event is organized with the Mathematics Department and the Office of Science & Business.

————–

“X-ray crystallography: Shining a light on protein structure.”
Thursday, Sept 15th, 11am, Building L, Library Lounge
Description: Proteins carry out many important cellular functions such as cellular signaling, molecular transport, and catalysing metabolic reactions. The structure of a protein can often give useful insights into how it carries out its function. X-ray crystallography is a technique used by biologists to determine the atomic structure of proteins. I will describe the technique and show some examples of how a protein’s structure reveals insights into its function. David B. Neau, Ph.D. is Staff Scientist, Northeastern Collaborative Access Team, Dept. of Chemistry, Cornell University. This event is part of the STEM series.

“How do you measure stuff you can’t see?”
Thursday, November 10th, 12:30pm, Building L, Library Lounge
Description: Adam Keil is chemist who detects very small amounts of stuff that might potentially have a very big impact on the world around us. From atmospheric gases in the Arctic to explosives in airports, Adam has worked with universities, governments, and corporations to develop methods and machines for the detection of trace amounts ‘high consequence’ materials. It takes some math, some science, some engineering, and sometimes some luck to find particles at one-millionth of one-millionth of a paperclip. Join Adam as he explains his work and how he got there–both to you and to himself! Adam Keil, Ph.D. is an atmospheric chemist whose doctorate is from Purdue University. He works as a consultant. This event is part of the STEM series.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go with Civil Engineering!
Tuesday, Nov 15th, 12:30pm, Building L, Library Lounge
Description: Civil Engineering is a diverse profession that offers you variety in multiple sub-disciplines involving critical thinking, problem solving, team work and adventure. This lecture will discuss the science, mathematics, exploration of different components and benefits of becoming a Civil Engineer. Kimberly Hastings is Resident Engineer with an emphasizes in Structural Engineering. Currently managing and overseeing construction of a large rail project for the largest inland port in the United States. This event is part of the STEM series.

2016 STEM Series: Chemistry, Engineering, Biology

We are excited to announce the 2016 STEM lectures here in the library. These lectures are hosted in partnership with the Math Department and Science & Business Subdivision.

“X-ray crystallography: Shining a light on protein structure.”
Sept 15th, 11am, Building L, Library Lounge
Description: Proteins carry out many important cellular functions such as cellular signaling, molecular transport, and catalysing metabolic reactions. The structure of a protein can often give useful insights into how it carries out its function. X-ray crystallography is a technique used by biologists to determine the atomic structure of proteins. I will describe the technique and show some examples of how a protein’s structure reveals insights into its function. David B. Neau, Ph.D. is Staff Scientist, Northeastern Collaborative Access Team, Dept. of Chemistry, Cornell University

“How do you measure stuff you can’t see?”
Nov 1st, 11am (or 12:30), Building L, Library Lounge
Description: Adam Keil is chemist who detects very small amounts of stuff that might potentially have a very big impact on the world around us. From atmospheric gases in the Arctic to explosives in airports, Adam has worked with universities, governments, and corporations to develop methods and machines for the detection of trace amounts ‘high consequence’ materials. It takes some math, some science, some engineering, and sometimes some luck to find particles at one-millionth of one-millionth of a paperclip. Join Adam as he explains his work and how he got there–both to you and to himself! Adam Keil, Ph.D. is an atmospheric chemist whose doctorate is from Purdue University. He works as a consultant. This event is part of the STEM series.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go with Civil Engineering!
Nov 15th, 12:30pm, Building L, Library Lounge
Description: Civil Engineering is a diverse profession that offers you variety in multiple sub-disciplines involving critical thinking, problem solving, team work and adventure. This lecture will discuss the science, mathematics, exploration of different components and benefits of becoming a Civil Engineer. Kimberly Hastings is Resident Engineer with an emphasizes in Structural Engineering. Currently managing and overseeing construction of a large rail project for the largest inland port in the United States. This event is part of the STEM series.

Challenges + Math + Creativity = Actuarial Science

Want to be an actuary? Don’t know what an actuary does? Have a cousin who should be an actuary? Watch this video.

Presenter Maria Schiopu is a quantitative analyst who provides hedging services for mutual funds at Milliman Financial Risk Management LLC. Learn more about the work she and her team are doing to create transformational improvement in the retirement securities industry. Maria graduated with a degree in mathematics from Northwestern University and a certificate in financial economics from the Kellogg School of Management. This event is part of the STEM series organized by the Math Department.

Challenges + Math + Creativity = Actuarial Science

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Engineering in Today’s Manufacturing Industry (online video)

Learn more about the role of engineering in the manufacturing industry, from planning projects to production and continuous improvement. Presenter Ray Baade is a project/layout engineer for Ace Metal Crafts, a custom manufacturing company that produces sanitary stainless steel parts for primarily those in the pharmaceutical and food processing industry. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Chicago. This event is part of the Moraine Valley Community College STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) program.

Engineering in Today’s Manufacturing Industry

The audio of this discussion is available below: