Argonne National Laboratory

 

Looking for an interesting day trip this summer? There is a great place to visit and it is less than 10 miles from MVCC. Argonne National Laboratory is managed by the University of Chicago and has a history of being on the cutting edge of many scientific discoveries (including work on the Manhattan Project). The laboratory  offers guided tours of the facility. Visit this historical site and take time  to walk through the adjoining forests to visit the waterfall and remnants of the Chicago Park District nursery.  Also check out the view of the Des Plaines Valley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quick Searching on Presidential Candidates’ Issues

Primary2016The Illinois Presidential Primary and State Primary election is coming up on March 15, 2016. If you haven’t had much time to look in depth at the presidential candidates’ individual websites, or you’re looking for a quicker option/comparison, Google has a way! Go to Google, input any presidential candidate’s name and the word “stance” (unquoted) into the search box.

GoogleStance

The results are presented in a box titled “Issues” with drop down arrows. Once you click on the arrow for a particular issue you’re presented with quotes from the candidate (from different sources) on that particular issue, showing their stance.

GoogleStanceResults

To learn more about using this tool read On the Road to the 2016 Elections with Google Search.”

*The contents of this blog post do not express the author’s or MVCC’s political views.*

Digital Natives

 

 

laptops“A Digital Native is a person who has been familiar with information technology since childhood.” Many educators and psychologists are analyzing the effects of this phenomena. If you want to explore this topic, check out the MVCC catalog or the library databases and find out how the digital movement is changing the way young people interact in every aspect of their lives.

You may also want to read this article from the December/January issue of Popular Mechanics.

What Can Algorithms Teach us about Life, Love, and Happiness? (Video)

Check out this video where Mathematician/computer Scientist Jeremy Kun discusses the power and limitations of algorithms to solve problems. What is an algorithm? How can algorithms be utilized to understand real-world problems? Will computers replace humans? This event is part of Moraine Valley’s STEM Lecture Series.

What Can Algorithms Teach us about Life, Love, and Happiness? (STEM talk)

The audio of this discussion is available below:

You are being watched, tracked, and tabulated. Do you care?

termsofservice

You are being watched, tracked, and tabulated. Do you care? Maybe you should Check out this online graphic novel by Josh Neufeld and Michael Keller called “Terms of Service.” It is an exploration of our online world where we trade free services for our data. BUT, as a graphic novel (comic) it is easy to read and (even) fun.

 

Spotting Fake Reviews & Bad Info on the Web

It’s easy to write online reviews. Real ones & fake ones. Write reviews of restaurants, films, books, no problem. But there are more series issues with reviews of services such as How about reviews of doctors or health services. Evaluating sources is part of information literacy (which is part of MVCC’s general education outcomes). Our librarians work with students and faculty in the classroom as part of their research.

I thought that this piece from the Newshour really hits on some interesting information literacy lessons. How do we decide whom to trust?

PBS Newshour: Spotting the fakes among the five-star reviews
Description: Online reviews of businesses, from your corner coffee shop to your airport cab ride, are now ubiquitous. But fraudulent consumer reviews are also on the rise. Special correspondent Jackie Judd meets a fake review writer, as well as the people who are working to crackdown on reviewers for hire.

Computer History Museum (online resources)

computerhistory

 

The Computer History Museum is located in the heart of Silicon Valley in Mountain View, California. Don’t stress if you are not a frequent visitor to the world’s technology capital. Take a visit to the Computer History Museum YouTube Channel. It has TONS of great videos featuring technological innovations and leaders in the web and computer technology. Here’s a short video on the birth of the World Wide Web:

Birth of the WWW

“Blowing Off Class? We Know” (From NY Times)

Hey students, ever wonder what we know about you? Well, in some ways, we do not know as much as you might think but in other ways we are interacting online more than ever. This article from the New York Times, Blowing Off Class? We Know by Goldie Blumenstyk, highlights some of the issues around college data collection. It is good food for thought for college students.

You probably know that librarians have been at the forefront of privacy protections for decades. Our library does not hold data on student checkouts, use of our research tools, or use of our facility. We support the library community’s principle that researchers and readers should be able to explore topics freely without scrutiny or judgment of others.

Here is a quote from the American Library Association’s statement on privacy:

Privacy is essential to the exercise of free speech, free thought, and free association. The courts have established a First Amendment right to receive information in a publicly funded library.1 Further, the courts have upheld the right to privacy based on the Bill of Rights of the U.S. Constitution.2 Many states provide guarantees of privacy in their constitutions and statute Privacy is essential to the exercise of free speech, free thought, and free association. The courts have established a First Amendment right to receive information in a publicly funded library.1 Further, the courts have upheld the right to privacy based on the Bill of Rights of the U.S. Constitution.2 Many states provide guarantees of privacy in their constitutions and statute law.3 Numerous decisions in case law have defined and extended rights to privacy.4

In a library (physical or virtual), the right to privacy is the right to open inquiry without having the subject of one’s interest examined or scrutinized by others. Confidentiality exists when a library is in possession of personally identifiable information about users and keeps that information private on their behalf.5

Protecting user privacy and confidentiality has long been an integral part of the mission of libraries. The ALA has affirmed a right to privacy since 1939.6 Existing ALA policies affirm that confidentiality is crucial to freedom of inquiry.7 Rights to privacy and confidentiality also are implicit in the Library Bill of Rights’8 guarantee of free access to library resources for all users.law.3 Numerous decisions in case law have defined and extended rights to privacy.4