Engineering a Super X-ray Strobe Light for Science (video)

If you have had a medical or dental X-ray, you know they are good at penetrating objects. Now imagine making those X-rays more intense by a billion times a billion and focusing them down to a size smaller than the point of a pin. What science could you do? Learn about the engineering involved in building large X-ray microscopes at Argonne National Laboratory. These football-field length instruments harness intense X-rays for use by every scientific discipline. Find out forefront examples of the resulting X-ray imaging created from STEM fields as diverse as entomology, medicine, biology, energy, environmental science, physics, materials chemistry and geology.

Engineering a Super X-ray Strobe Light for Science

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Check out the next episode of the Library’s new podcast MVCCPOV: Voices from the Valley

MVCCPOV – The conversations continue.

In the fourth episode (a two-part podcast): Message, Music, and Mosaics MVCC’s Muslim Student Association (MSA) shares about their dedication and diligence to community service and charitable fundraising. Then in Part Two we learn about the MSA’s participation in the college’s Mosaics Grant (Muslim Voices in America) during the March 2018 Artist Residence Week called “Street Science.” Performance clips are included. This episode concludes with MSA members sharing their thoughts about participating in the inaugural season of MVCCPOV.

This episode has both great insights from the students and great music clips from the live Street Science event!

Listen to Chapter One Episode Four: Message, Music, and Mosaics
Part 1
Part 2

Listen to other episodes of MVCCPOV: Voices from the Valley Podcast

Election Energy is in the Air

If you haven’t heard, Election Day is Tuesday 11/6!

Here is a little Election Encouragement. Simply put, regardless of why you vote, when you vote, or the candidates who you trust with your vote… PLEASE vote.

Regardless of personal identity or political ideology; party preferences or isolated issues; income bracket or educational attainment we can all unite around a single collaborative action-VOTING; which causes the biggest and best American coalition of solidarity-VOTERS!

Election Day for non-early or absentee voters is Tuesday November 6, 2018


In the comments section write back or share a picture with your voting Affirmation.

The Fascinating History of Cemeteries

In the SW suburbs, we have some major cemeteries just down the road from our main campus! This TED Ed video seemed appropriate. It may be a week late given last week was Halloween!

“Spindly trees, rusted gates, crumbling stone, a solitary mourner: these things come to mind when we think of cemeteries. But not long ago, many burial grounds were lively places, with gardens and crowds of people — and for much of human history, we didn’t bury our dead at all. How did cemeteries become what they are today? Keith Eggener delves into our ever-evolving rituals for honoring the dead.”

The fascinating history of cemeteries – Keith Eggener

Energy for a Sustainable Future: What is it? How do we make it happen?

Energy is a multidisciplinary subject touching each of our daily lives, yet its governing concepts remain abstract to most. This presentation will promote energy literacy to a wide audience. We will discuss the credibility of information about energy and communicate about energy and energy use in meaningful ways. This knowledge will allow us to make informed decisions based on an understanding of impacts and consequences. This will provide the audience a greater understanding why we need to thoroughly understand our current energy systems to cope with the sustainability issues we are facing. This event is organized by the MVCC Center for Sustainability.

Dr. Jin Ho Jo is Associate Professor of Technology at Illinois State University, teaching in the Renewable Energy program. As the Associate Director of the Center for Renewable Energy, he also leads the Solar Power Research Group. His research, which has been widely published, focuses on the use of renewable energy systems and sustainable building strategies to reduce negative impacts of urbanization. His 2010 Ph.D. from Arizona State University was the nation’s first in sustainability.

Energy for a Sustainable Future: What is it? How do we make it happen?

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Pumpkin Contest Results

Are you curious about the results of the Library Pumpkin Contest? It was a great success! We had 19 fabulous pumpkins in the contest this year and raised over $400 dollars for scholarships. Thank you to everyone who created pumpkins and who came by to vote for your favorites. The top three vote getters were:

1st place – Arab Student Union – Preserving Arab Heritage

 

2nd place – Library Technical Services Dept. – Cat-O-Lantern

3rd place – International Student Ambassadors – Haunted House

Keep listening! Episode 2 of the MVCC: POV podcast series is available

Last week we highlighted the launch of the library’s new podcast series–MVCC:POV, and this week we are continuing the conversation.

In this two part ep, Episode 2 – Class, Culture, Clothing, and Stereotypes, the MSA dig into issues that concern them in their day-to-day lives. Each part of the episode is compiled from two conversations recorded about a month apart during the spring of 2018.

PART ONE: The MSA discuss issues related to class, culture, and clothing.

PART TWO: The MSA share insights about the stereotypes they encounter and how they respond.MSA Recording Sessions 4_19_18

For more episodes check out the MVCC:POV Homepage

 

MVCC:POV Season 1

We’re excited to debut a new podcast from the library! MVCC:POV is a podcast about authentic discovery of social justice conversations on topics related to equity, inclusion, and diversity. Throughout the series, we hand the mic over to members of our community to let their voices be heard.

In our first season, we’ve connected with two student groups on campus: the Muslim Student Association and the Arab Student Union. Over the next coming weeks we’ll be featuring each episode through this blog.

Chapter 1 -Episode 1 features the Muslim student association. During the episode they discuss what it means to them to be Muslim. Each student in the club takes a turn in voicing how they relate to Islam as an individual.

Also, the group starts each meeting with a “Positive of the Week” which you’ll get to hear interspersed throughout the episode.

We hope you enjoy this first episode and look back to this blog next week where we’ll feature episode 2!

Here’s the link to the featured episode: Chapter 1 – Episode 1

For more episodes check out the MVCC:POV Homepage

 

This is How We Resist: Civic Engagement of Immigrant-Origin Students in Post-Trump US

Immigrant-origin college students (those who have immigrated to the US themselves and children of immigrants) are a growing population. Currently, a third of all college-age young people in the US are first- or second-generation immigrants (Rumbaut & Komaie, 2010).
As immigrant-origin students come of age, they become keenly aware of the social and cultural reflections of themselves in the “social mirror” (Suarez-Orozco, 2004). With xenophobia, racism and discrimination on the rise, especially as directed towards immigrant groups in the US (Chavez, 2008), it is critical to understand how these students develop within contexts that give them complicated messages about how to belong.
Utilizing a strengths-based perspective, we will explore the ways in which immigrant-origin youth respond to such discrimination and how this might impact their developmental experiences. Drawing on a number of mixed-methods studies of immigrant-origin college students, this presentation will highlight the contributions of immigrant-origin youth to their families and communities as well as the ways in which they conceptualize and engage in resistance to social inequality.

“This is How We Resist”: Understanding the Civic Engagement of Immigrant-Origin College Students in Post-Trump US

The audio of this discussion is available below: