This is How We Resist: Civic Engagement of Immigrant-Origin Students in Post-Trump US

Immigrant-origin college students (those who have immigrated to the US themselves and children of immigrants) are a growing population. Currently, a third of all college-age young people in the US are first- or second-generation immigrants (Rumbaut & Komaie, 2010).
As immigrant-origin students come of age, they become keenly aware of the social and cultural reflections of themselves in the “social mirror” (Suarez-Orozco, 2004). With xenophobia, racism and discrimination on the rise, especially as directed towards immigrant groups in the US (Chavez, 2008), it is critical to understand how these students develop within contexts that give them complicated messages about how to belong.
Utilizing a strengths-based perspective, we will explore the ways in which immigrant-origin youth respond to such discrimination and how this might impact their developmental experiences. Drawing on a number of mixed-methods studies of immigrant-origin college students, this presentation will highlight the contributions of immigrant-origin youth to their families and communities as well as the ways in which they conceptualize and engage in resistance to social inequality.

“This is How We Resist”: Understanding the Civic Engagement of Immigrant-Origin College Students in Post-Trump US

The audio of this discussion is available below:

President Roosevelt digital archives

As reported by the New York Times on October 17, 2018, the Library of Congress now holds the largest collection of President Theodore Roosevelt’s papers and includes 276,000 documents and over 460,000 digital images that date back to 1759. The collection began in 1917 when Roosevelt first sent items to the Library of Congress for “safekeeping.” These items later became a permanent gift from Roosevelt and the collection grew over the years from the contributions of relatives and a literary executor. The Library of Congress Roosevelt holdings are digitized and accessible online and include diaries, speeches, letters, and other documents. Other collections of Roosevelt’s papers are located at Harvard University Library and The FDR Presidential Library. Use the links below to learn more about the Library of Congress and other Roosevelt collections and to view and search through thousands of digital images.

https://www.loc.gov/collections/theodore-roosevelt-papers/about-this-collection/

http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/archives/collections.html

https://library.harvard.edu/collections/theodore-roosevelt-collection

 

Comic Book Documentaries

Stream the following comic book documentaries recently added to our Films on Demand collection to coincide with this year’s One Book One College. Each documentary presents a different aspect of comic book history.

  • The American Comic Strip surveys the history of comic strips with renowned artists Mort Walker, John Romita, Will Eisner, John Cullen Murphy, Sean Kelly, and Milton Caniff.
  • The Art of Spiegelman is a biographical film on Art Spiegelman, creator of popular comic strips Maus and In the Shadow of No Towers. The film features interviews of Spiegelman and his wife, Françoise Mouly.
  • In Search of Dan Cooper examines the creation of the French-Belgian Dan Cooper series, inspired by Canadian pilots stationed overseas, and how the comic strip evolved over time.

Want to learn more? Stream Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle. Season 1 and Dear Mr. Watterson: An Exploration of Calvin & Hobbes through Hoopla and browse our extensive graphic novel collection in person.

Improving Energy Materials Using Quantum Physics and Machine Learning (video)

Materials are useful – they store energy for cell phones and electric cars, turn sunlight into electricity, and track your movements while you exercise. How do scientists understand and improve materials at the level of atoms? And what does machine learning and quantum physics have to do with all of this? Maria Chan, a scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, will explain the state of the art of materials discovery and improvement. This event is part of our STEM lecture series.

Watch this talk here: Improving Energy Materials Using Quantum Physics and Machine Learning (MVCC login required off campus).

Life & Education in the Netherlands (video)

Dutch faculty members who are part of the CCID exchange partners discuss Dutch society and working in Dutch higher education.
Speaker Ingrid Koers is from Gorinchem, Netherlands which is about one hour outside of Amsterdam and teaches health care professionals at Da Vinci College in Dordrecht.
Speaker Herman Hofmeije is from Leusden, Netherlands which is about 40 minutes from Amsterdam. He teaches math and calculus at ROC Midden Nederland located in Utrecht.

Life & Education in the Netherlands

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Closeout Hispanic Heritage Month with Classical Music

Celebrate then end of National Hispanic Heritage Month with the beautiful diversity, warmth, and cultural richness of Latin America with inspiring works of classical music by Latin American composers. Click on the links to hear a brief selection of composers and performers  whose bodies of work are still being celebrated today.

1) Arturo Márquez: Danzon no. 2 -A modern Mexican classic inspired by a Cuban dance.

2) Tárrega, Francisco: Capricho árabe -Tárrega’s extremely popular Capricho árabe, was composed after a trip to Granada, and is dedicated to his friend and composer Tomás Bretón.

3) Carlos Chavez: Sinfonia india, “Symphony No. 2”- Chavez used tunes, rhythms, and instruments from indiginous Mexican cultures in his symphony.

4) Revueltas, Silvestre: Sensemaya– Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas used an eponymous poem by Cuban poet Nicolás Guillén as inspiration to depict a sacrifice in a traditional Afro-Cuban religious ceremony.

5) Rodrigo, Joaquín: Concierto de Aranjuez– Undoubtedly, the most famous and most acclaimed guitar concerto ever written.

6) Albéniz, Isaac: Suite española No. 1, Op. 47 – A recital favorite with an unforgettable opening.

To explore more pieces by these composers, select the Naxos Music Library icon that can be found on the Moraine Valley Library website. Find it under Research Tools, and then select, E-Books, Streaming Video, and Digital Media.