HURRICANE HARVEY

Not too many people in the Houston, Texas, area will forget August 26, 2017! Just as forecasted, Hurricane Harvey made landfall bringing with it a lot of rain and wind, and spawning many tornadoes. The devastation is enormous.

Want to give a helping hand by means of a donation? Check out this article by The New York Times. There are any number of groups or associations that are providing assistance. Even a modest amount such as $10 will help someone who perhaps has lost everything. Click here for the link to the article.

Free Event: Supercomputing at Argonne National Lab

We are excited to share information on the first discussion in our STEM series:

Science & Computer Science in the Argonne Leadership Computer Facility featuring Ben Lenard, Argonne National Laboratory
Wednesday, October 11th: Noon-1 PM, Library Lounge, Building L
Ben will talk about how supercomputers at LCF help to solve problems within the world, from physics to medicine.
Ben is responsible for overseeing the administration and improvement of database systems in the ALCF’s supercomputing environment. These databases are critical to many of the facility’s support services, including job scheduling, job accounting, and business intelligence. In 2016, Ben deployed the IBM Data Server Manager to help streamline database administration tasks. With this tool in place, Ben has a better idea of how the databases are being used, while developers have an improved method for identifying and addressing any performance issues with their queries. In addition to his day-to-day responsibilities, Ben has been strong advocate for the ALCF and for computer science, volunteering for events like the Hour of Code and Argonne’s public open house. He is also currently pursuing a PhD in Computer and Information Sciences at DePaul University. Prior to Argonne Ben worked in the financial services industry for 13 years as well as academia for 2 years.

History of Labor Day

Many states celebrated a “labor day” in the late 1800s but Labor Day became a federal holiday in 1894. One of the probable reasons for the federal holiday was that U.S. President Grover Cleveland was attempting to placate organized labor after the Pullman Strike, a nation-wide railroad strike that ended after many lives were lost and much property was destroyed. Workers began the strike at the Pullman Company in Chicago on May 11, 1894, as a reaction to wage cuts. You can visit the Pullman National Monument and Historic Pullman Foundation at 11141 S. Cottage Grove Ave. in Chicago.

Dr. Sylvia M. Jenkins, President

Moraine Valley Community College celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year. To learn more about and to re-live some of what those five decades have been like, the college has been collecting oral histories. Throughout the semester we will be highlighting these videos.

“Being the college president is just a position that allows me to give more support to many, many people.”

Dr. Sylvia Jenkins started at Moraine Valley as a part-time librarian in 1986. She went on to hold various positions at the college and is currently the President of Moraine Valley Community College. When she began in 1986, many of the founders of the college were still here and she was able to learn a lot from them. She enjoys being surrounded by people who understand that the purpose of a community college is to help people succeed.

To enjoy more of these oral histories, along with historic photos and documents, visit the MVCC College Archives.

Dr. Sylvia M. Jenkins, President

Thinking about Charlottesville

Are you struggling with how to process the hate and violence committed in Charlottesville this past weekend? One step you can take is to better understand the history and ideology of the groups involved. American Swastika: Inside the white power movement’s hidden spaces of hate, by criminology professor Pete Simi and sociology professor Robert Futrell, draws on a decade of research and interviews to reveal how white power groups recruit,organize, and perpetuate their ideology. You can follow this up with a short interview on NPR with ex-FBI agent, Michael German, who explains how although the group names have changed since the 1990s, the underlying ideologies and tactics are the same. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) has also just published a guide for students to understand and counter the alt-right on campuses. And finally, if you want to take a stand against hate in your own community, the SPLC has an excellent guide for recognizing and responding to every day bigotry. If you’d like more recommendations, just ask a librarian.

Disco Demolition Exhibit

This is part three in the series of things to do in Chicago this summer.

In the exhibit “Disco Demolition: The Night Disco Died,” the Elmhurst History Museum has gathered memorabilia from an infamous July 1979 event during a doubleheader at Comiskey Park in Chicago. That day, radio station WLUP sponsored a promotion featuring DJ Steve Dahl, and anyone who brought a disco album to the park got in for 98 cents. The plan was to blow up the disco albums on the field after the first game. The albums were blown up, and then thousands of fans went out on the field and would not leave until the police showed up. The Sox had to forfeit the second game because of the condition of the field.

The book from 2016 about the historic night is available in the library. The Elmhurst History Museum is at 120 E. Park Avenue in Elmhurst. www.elmhursthistory.org

Ask the FCC to Support Net Neutrality

Libraries across US are speaking up today in support of Net Neutrality. The FCC is moving to create a two-tiered system (fast lane vs slow lane) on the Internet. For decades, libraries and librarians have stood up for privacy and fairness in accessing information. You can contact the FCC and lawmakers here: Battle for the Net.

This impacts all of us and will have implications for Moraine Valley students who may not have access to technology at home or who cannot pay additional money to access the fast lane. This is an important issue, and we should take note.

What is net neutrality?
“Net neutrality is the principle that Internet providers like Comcast & Verizon should not control what we see and do online. In 2015, startups, Internet freedom groups, and 3.7 million commenters won strong net neutrality rules from the US Federal Communication Commission (FCC). The rules prohibit Internet providers from blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization—”fast lanes” for sites that pay, and slow lanes for everyone else” (from Battle for the Net website).

Here are a couple of videos that explain the issue:

Why Net Neutrality Makes the Internet Great

Net Neutrality: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (from 2014, for mature viewers)

Here Comes the Eclipse

 

On August 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This solar event will range from a partial eclipse (Chicago) to a total eclipse (Carbondale, IL).  One of our Summer in the City museums to visit in anticipation of this eclipse is the Alder Planetarium.  The museum is planning numerous events to celebrate the fact that it has been 92 years since Chicago has experienced this scientific phenomenon.

Check out the NASA site and Dyer Observatory (Vanderbilt  University) for more information.

 

COMPLETE: Wednesday, 7/5, 3PM: Library System Down for Scheduled Maintenance

Update: The system upgrade has been completed!

Thank you for your patience and have a great day!

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Access to the library’s resources, including the catalog and subscription research databases will be down for a couple of hours on Wednesday, July 5th beginning at 3PM so we can perform a needed system update.  Sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.

If you need any assistance, please Ask a Librarian!

Thanks!